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Edward M. Fashing is a cattle and grain farmer in Sturgeon, Missouri, a lector in his parish, and an activist in several farm organizations. He laments the hard times that have come to farmers in America, and he recommends we read Victor Davis Hanson’s stirring book, Fields Without Dreams; Defending the Agrarian Idea, because, he says, “I cannot read the book without weeping. I may never finish it.” Ed has a BS from Loyola University of Chicago (1960) and MS in chemistry from DePaul University (1968). He taught chemistry and physical science for six years at University of Illinois (Chicago, and he has also taught geology, environmental studies, and the chemistry of hazardous materials at Triton College in River Grove, Illinois, and physics at Truman State and Columbia College in Missouri. He has done cancer and aflatoxin chemical research, and worked as audio-visual planning editor for Encyclopaedia Britannica Film Corp. Some 43 years ago, he married Annette Lubker. They produced five children, all members of 4H, and raised ten Missouri State Fair and county fair champion steer carcasses. Ed was Newman Community faculty moderator at two Illinois colleges.

Here, he writes about the meeting of the World Trade Organization held last October in Cancun, Mexico. It is a narrative full of quiet seething over the high-handed treatment of the small American farmer by U.S. megacorporations and by the Bush Administration. Normally, we do not footnote our pieces. Here, we do so because we think it is necessary to document Fashing's charges, which may sound wild, but which we find all too believable.

WTO Meeting in Cancun, Mexico
October 2003

Edward M. Fashing

AN OVERVIEW:

In Cancun, Mexico, Mexican President Vicente Fox opened the Fifth Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organization [WTO] on September 10, 2003. Present were almost 1600 representatives from 146 nations. Cambodia and Nepal started processing to be new members on day 2. Also present were 15,000 protesters to the WTO's global trade summit as 20,000 Mexican military and police protected official country representatives. {1.} Mexico spent $25 million; of that amount $5 million was for security. {2} [Originally WTO was called GATT.]

The protesters, called globophobes, were farmers from developed countries, farmers from undeveloped countries, representatives from non-governmental organizations (NGOs), environmentalists, international social agencies' staff, unionists, anarchists, pacifists, and Mexican revolutionaries. A South Korean farm leader, Lee Kyung Hae, killed himself to protest WTO rules and actions on Sept. 10. Hae's casket was carried through the streets by 120 South Koreans on day three. {3} The talks collapsed due to protests, the supposed bullying tactics of the U.S. and E.U. on the poorer countries, and the desire of undeveloped countries to not continue growing traditional crops, sovereignty, tariffs, subsidies or control of their natural resources. {4.}

Trying to analyze what happened at Cancun is like analyzing the description of the mythical elephant from five blind men feeling it at different points.

Many Agricultural Organizations united to go to Cancun's WTO meeting since they believed the actions of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Farm Bills, the U.S. Trade Representative [USTR] Robert Zoellick, and U.S. State Department policies do not work to protect U.S. farmers nor world farmers. {5.} Representing U.S. family farmers and family ranchers were: the American Agricultural Movement, Inc., American Corn Growers Association [ACGA], Federation of Southern Cooperatives/Land Assistance Fund, Missouri Rural Crisis Center, National Family Farm Coalition [NFFC], National Farmers Organization, National Farmers Union [NFU], Organization for Competitive Markets [OCM], Soybean Producers of America, Global Trade Watch, Via Campesina and Oxfam.

The Agricultural Policy Analysis Center [APAC] from the University of Tennessee headed by Dr. Daryll E. Ray and Organization for Competitive Markets helped farmers plan for the WTO meeting. APAC suggests U.S. subsidies could be cut if: (1) acreage diversion through short term set-asides and longer term acreage reserves; (2) a farmer owned reserve would be implemented; (3) other price support mechanisms should be enacted; (4) APAC claims these policies would decrease subsidies by $10 billion. {6.}

Important WTO issues are: elimination of agricultural tariffs, import fees, and agricultural subsidies, since small countries rely on them for operating expenses. {7} Early on the second day, 20 developing nations demanded discussion of the Singapore Issues: (1) Foreign Investment rule changes be promulgated; (2) Competition and antitrust laws be enforced; (3) Trade facilitation with fairness should be guaranteed; and (4) Local government enterprises should not become foreign owned or privatized as a result of the pressure from the World Bank [WB] and International Monetary Fund [IMF] regulations and demands. {4.}

Also, the interests of four Sub-Saharan African cotton growing countries [Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali] concerning developed countries' subsidized cotton became an important issue which was denied by the developing countries. {4} The EU subsidizes farmers $78 billion while the U.S. subsidies mainly large farmers $40 billion; Western developed countries subsidize $300 billion. [Some dispute these numbers.] {8.}

Some believe as Robert Stallman, head of the American Farm Bureau Federation [AFBF], that the Bush Administration wanted not to offend rural Western State voters who gave George W. Bush his narrow presidential electoral vote victory. Of the total agribusiness political contributions, donations to the Republican Party increased from 56% [$37 million] in 1992 to 72% [$53 million] in the 2000 election. {8.}

The EU representative Paschal Lamy attempted to discuss two of the Singapore Issues and was chastised by Brussels and opposed by the Korean delegates. European countries want large subsidies to persist. {4.}

Fabian Society international socialist democrats were critical of the influence of the United Nations, IMF and WB ruled by rich countries pushing progressive globalism and not protecting the environment. Fabianists believe the rich countries are not accountable to national parliaments and against universal trade union rights. {9.}

The media released propaganda from multinational corporations that are determined to control many countries and maintain high profit levels. {10.}

Foreign maize [corn] and sugar producers cannot compete with subsidized U.S. agribusiness, big commodity producers and factory farms. {10.} The U.S. [Robert Zoellick, U.S. Trade Representative, USTR] and the EU promised to scale back agricultural subsidies if the smaller countries would "eliminate tariffs and controls in exchange for trade liberalization." {8.} {10.} {11.}

U.S. officials claim the, "Slow disappearance of small scale farmers is caused by technological & scientific advances and increased efficiency not trade policies."

Anarchists, other extremists, and Mexican revolutionaries got much of the opening publicity diverting attention from agricultural problems as anarchists did at the 1999 WTO meeting in Seattle. On the last day, protesters, who had climbed barricades earlier, gave the police carnations. {2.}

My Opinions:

Some believe that the U.S. is using the WTO to export GMO crops. AFBF claims 5 million members when there are fewer than 2 million farmers. AFBf was formed by Chicago commodity traders decades ago to do their bidding.  AFBF is not the voice of many family farmers. I believe that the Department of Agriculture, Congress, U.S. State Department, and the U.S. Trade Representative are controlled by the Chicago Board of Trade [CBOT], Chicago Mercantile Exchange [CME] and multinational corporations through the government-multinational business revolving door; the CBOT and CME are places that manipulate commodity contracts and gamble with world farmers' futures.

The National Cattlemen's Beef Association, National Corn Producers, American Farm Bureau, and the National Pork Producers Council are controlled by big packers, huge cattle feed lot owners, big multinational grain exporters, and meat exporters.  Rank and file family farmers are slowly realizing the truth and joining: United Stockmen's Association [R-Calf], American Corn Growers Association, National Farmers Union, the Organization for Competitive Markets, and the National Family Farm Coalition.

Several years ago, I wrote a letter explaining the phoniness of the belief that AFBF represents small farmers.  The letter was printed in the British Farmers Union Paper.  I received letters from a British lady farmer and two members of the German Bundestag expressing surprise because they never realized that many U.S. family farmers did not follow the philosophy of AFBF.

With big food sellers like WAL-MART being an oligopsony [a limited number of sellers working together] and the multinational corporation cartel being an oligopoly [a limited number of buyers] farmers are economically squeezed in the middle.  The U.S. Congress and the U.S. Department of Justice refuse to change laws and where possible prosecute constricting marketers. The corruption in agribusiness multinational corporations makes the ENRON and other cheating scandals on Wall Street pale by comparison. The number of U.S. farmers is too small to have much political influence and family farmers as a group are too economically stressed to have much influence. One might wonder why lawsuits cannot cure the problem.  Some farm organizations are bringing lawsuits against big agribusiness companies.  However, biased judges and delays of decades before cases are heard- delay justice. Multinational corporations have hundreds of lawyers to discover the slightest flaw in any case.

Extremist greens get Congress to pass laws to restrict land ownership and desire to turn the U.S. into a socialist state like countries in Europe. Some extremists wish to return North America's flora and fauna to that of 1492.  Environmental rules and laws are harshly applied to small farmers while the polluting factory farms get government subsidies.  With their large legal staffs factory farms and large agribusiness delay enforcement of environmental rules.

Every dollar eliminated from the U.S. farm economy represents 2.1 to 2.3 dollars in the rural economy.  This is called the "multiplier effect."  In the early 70s the U.S. rural multiplier effect was 7-10. In some South and Central American countries the multiplier effect may be 20 or greater.

Years ago, the American Agriculture Movement, Inc. pushed for 100% of PARITY; today some ridicule the concept.  PARITY is a concept comparing farm commodity prices to the fair and balanced equilibrium found from 1910-1914 among all sectors of the economy: farmer, middleman, storekeeper, and eater. Today most commodities only bring about 35% of the adjusted income of the 1910s.  With family producers' income down and the multiplier effect decreased, U.S. rural, in fact world rural, economies suffer greatly bringing rarely imagined poverty and famine on the world. Progress in technological yield improvement has been exceeded so that farmers suffer by lowering of commodity prices due to their own efficiency.

The U.S. farm policies of the recent past mainly benefit multinational corporations, WB, IMF, big farmers, agribusiness, extremist environmentalists, and bankers.

The predatory multinational corporations have made increasing profit at the health and economic expense of world rural families, urban factory workers, and union members.

World economic power has shifted to China and Islamic countries.  Empowering China are predatory companies as WAL-MART, J.C. Penny, K-Mart, Cargill, Archer Daniels Midland, Tyson-IBP, Monsanto, ConAgra, and others are helped by U.S. politicians, IMF, WB, USDA and the USTR.

World citizens should demand that the WTO work to resolve world food problems for world neighbors even if some influential corporations will profit less. The WTO's level playing field is filled with land mines and is prone to earthquake faults. The lesser-developed countries are caught in a downward food production cycle, poverty, and social upheaval; the developed countries are losing millions of blue and white-collar jobs.

In the Mayan Indian dialect, Cancun means "Snake pit." Anyone who saw the movies "Snake pit" or "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest" should have an insight into the crazy results of WTO-Cancun to world farmers. Cancun truly was a snake pit! {1.{4.}

Edward M. Fashing, U.S. Farmer

Bibliography:

Some facts and information were obtained from: The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Chicago Tribune/Knight Ridder News Service, San Francisco Chronicle, Christian Science Monitor, Guardian Limited, Yellow Times andWTO Geneva Switzerland Web Site: http://www.WTO.org

FOOTNOTES:

{1} Itano, N. (11 Sept. 2003) At global trade summit, strange new bedfellows Christian Science Monitor, sec. World: p.1

{2} WTO Meeting collapses amid North-South divide (8-14 Sept. 2003) Mexico Solidarity Network Weekly News and Analysis

{3} Carlson, L. (16 Sept. 2003) The WTO kills farmers: in memory of Lee Kyung Hae Americas Program Analysts, americasirc-online.org  http://www.foodfirst.org/media/ printformat.php?id=321,

{4} Guebert, A. (19 Sept. 2003) Mexican stand-off: what happened in Cancun what it means, Final Word-American Corn Growers Association: Issue 66 finalword@agnet.net

{5} Naylor, G. & Hoff, D. et al. (3 Sept. 2003) Press release. "U.S. farmers reject draft WTO declaration on agriculture; refute USTR Zoellick's proposal on global agricultural trade" [http://.farmaid.org] http://.farmaid.com/event/press/docs/pr_09032003.asp

{6} Ray, D. E., De La Torre Ugarte D. G., & Tiller, K.J. (Summer 2003) Rethinking US agricultural policy: changing course to secure farmer livelihoods worldwide, executive summary Agricultural Policy Analysis Center, The University of Tennessee dray@utk.edu  http://.agpolicy.org/blueprint.html

{7} Mudd, K. (16 Sept. 2003) "Commentary: let's stop the silly rhetoric about "Farm subsidies and call them for what they are 'corporate welfare.'" Albert Krebs: AGRIBUSINESS EXAMINER ##286, [avkrebs@earthlink.net] http://www.eal.com/CARP/

{8} Becker, E., (16 Sept. 2003) Coming U.S. vote figures in walkout at trade talks, Cancun, Mexico The New York Times nytimes.com

{9} Jacobs, M. (19 Sept. 2003) Beyond Cancun, globalism can be a force for social justice, but only if capitalism is managed with that aim The Guardian Unlimited

{10} Dellios, Hugh & Martin, Andy. (13 Sept. 2003) "Farmers across globe decry U.S.-led trade policies at WTO summit." Knight Ridder/[Chicago] Tribune Information Services news@menafn.com

{11} Ray, D. E. (19 Sept. 2003) Food is matter of national security for all, APAC Weekly Articles, The University of Tennessee http://www.ag.policy.org.org/ dray@utk.edu APAC Weekly Article, Communication, September 24,2003

{12} Ethical Guidelines for International Trade Holy See's Note to Ministerial Conference of World Trade Organization (2003, Sept. 10) L'Osservatore Romano, Vatican City

{13} Sharma, D. (17 Sept. 2003) "The new pirates of the sea" The rich few who control trade-Cancun fiasco WTO: end of the road, dsharma@ndf.vsnl.net.in

{14} Ambrose, S., (12 Sept. 2003) Korean farmer's suicide rattles Cancun activists assess meaning of dramatic death of farm leader Molly Spence, National Family Farm Coalition nffc@nffc.net http://nffc.net

{15} Carlson, R. (2003 Oct.) NFU: Farmers' interests left out of trade talks at WTO meetings National Farmers Union News, 50, Number 8, p.4

{16} Hansen, J. (18 Sept. 2003) "Nebraska farmers union president Hansen characterizes public debate over AG subsidies as 'Dysfunctional and non-productive'" Albert Krebs: The Agribusiness Examiner #287  avkrebs@earthlink.net].

{17} De La Torre Ugarte D.G. (19 Sept. 2003) Food is matter of national security for all APAC Weekly Articles, The University of Tennessee http://www.ag.policy.org.org/ dray@utk.edu

{18} Robinson, C. (20 Sept. 2003) Latest news in brief on the GM issue Weekly Watch Number 40  ngin@gmwatch.org weekly@gmwatch.org

{19} Mitchell, L. (18 Sept. 2003) "American Corn Growers Association charges latest USDA ERS income projections 'maliciously misleading'" Albert Krebs: The Agribusiness Examiner #287 avkrebs@earthlink.net

{20} Jacobs, M. (19 Sept. 2003) Beyond Cancun, globalism can be a force for social justice, but only if capitalism is managed with that aim The Guardian Unlimited

{21} Guatemalan farmer: Maldonado, A. (2003 Sept. 28) From the highlands to your grocer The New York Times nytimes.com

{22} Mullin, R., (2003 Sept. 22). No can do in Cancun Chemical & Engineering News 22, p.8.

{23} Callicrate, M. (6 Oct. 2003) Personal Communication Mike@nobull.net

QUOTES

THE VATICAN:

Pope John Paul II said, " No model of economic growth or international trade that neglects social justice or marginalizes human groups and human development is sustainable in the long-term, even from the purely economic point of view."

{12} Ethical Guidelines for International Trade Holy See's Note to Ministerial Conference of World Trade Organization (2003, Sept. 10) L'Osservatore Romano, Vatican City

FOREIGN FARMERS' SPOKESMAN:

Divinder Sharma (distinguished Indian food and trade policy analyst)

"... African cotton producers realise only 60% of their costs although their cost of production is less than half of that of developed countries."

"[T] he countries that produce mounting surpluses of wheat, rice, corn, soybeans, sugar beat [sic], cotton ... under environmentally unsound conditions leading to an ecological catastrophe."

World Bank/IMF have forced successive governments to adopt policies that forces farmers to abandon staple crops like wheat, rice and coarse cereals, and diversity to cash crops. Punjab, the country's food bowl, is presently engaged in a desperate effort to shift from wheat-rice cropping pattern to cultivating flowers...."

"Through a variety of instruments, the rich countries have ensured complete protectionism."

WTO "has successfully managed ... to pit the farmers of the developing world and the industrialized countries against each other."

Divinder believes that unless farmers' associations in developed countries come to the rescue of their less blessed cousins in the developing world, agribusiness companies will continue to have the last laugh. "Western countries have got too used to being a parasite on the developing countries."

{13} Sharma, D. (17 Sept. 2003) "The new pirates of the sea" The rich few who control trade-Cancun fiasco WTO: end of the road, dsharma@ndf.vsnl.net.in

NFFC:

George Naylor, president of the National Family Farm Coalition [NFFC], whose family farmed in Iowa since 1919 said, "Our agricultural policy is not good for the U.S. and not good for the people of the U.S." "Does it make sense to export our crops for less than it costs to make them?"  "The differential is made up by farm subsidies so farmers can continue to produce..."

{10} Dellios, Hugh & Martin, Andy. (13 Sept. 2003) "Farmers across globe decry U.S.-led trade policies at WTO summit." Knight Ridder/[Chicago] Tribune Information Services news@menafn.com

George Naylor also said, "The curse of low farm prices has spread around the world thanks to the U.S. Farm Bill and free trade agreements written for the benefit of multinational food corporations and to the detriment of family farmers, the environment, and each nation's economy."

{5} Naylor, G. & Hoff, D. et al. (3 Sept. 2003) Press release. "U.S. farmers reject draft WTO declaration on agriculture; refute USTR Zoellick's proposal on global agricultural trade" [http://.farmaid.org] http://.farmaid.com/event/press/docs/pr_09032003.asp

George Naylor believes, "If [farmers] said no more subsidies, all farmers would be out of business because not one dollar would be lent to them.'

{10} Dellios, H. & Martin, A. (13 Sept. 2003) "Farmers across globe decry U.S.-led trade policies at WTO summit." Knight Ridder/[Chicago] Tribune Information Services news@menafn.com

OCM:

Keith Mudd, VP-Organization for Competitive Markets, Monroe City, Missouri, farmer:

"[T]he truth is that all farmers, regardless of size, must use the subsidy just to raise the value received for their commodity above the cost of production." ... Look somewhere else for a scapegoat; it is not the American farmer draining the United States Treasury. The real transfer of wealth is accumulating in Cargill and ADM's bank accounts." ...  [T]he U.S. government buys surplus grain from American farmers and sends it halfway around the world ... instead of first buying what Ethiopians produce.

{7}   Mudd, K. (16 Sept. 2003) "Commentary: let's stop the silly rhetoric about "Farm subsidies and call them for what they are 'corporate welfare.'" Albert Krebs: AGRIBUSINESS EXAMINER ##286, [avkrebs@earthlink.net] http:www.eal.com/CARP/

Lee Kyung Hae and Other South Korean Farmers

Suicide of Lee Kyung Hae [56 yrs old], former president of the South Korean Advanced Farmers Federation, rice farmer scaled the fence in front of Mexican Riot Police then stabbed himself in the heart. On the first day Sept. 10, 2003, Hae died.

Lee Kyung Hae said, "The WTO Kills Farmers."

Lee Kyung Hae wrote, "[A]fter the Uruguay Round Agreement ... we Korean Farmers realized that ... our destinies are no longer in our own hands. ... Stop basing your WTO negations on flawed logic and mere diplomatic gestures. take agriculture out of the WTO system. ... Since [massive importing and dumping] we small farmers have never been paid over our production costs. ... These lands paved now were mostly rice paddies built by generations over thousands of years. ... [H]uman beings are in an endangered situation. ... [T]he false logic of neoliberalism will wipe out the diversity of global agriculture and be disastrous to all human beings."

{3.} Carlson, L. (16 Sept. 2003) The WTO kills farmers: in memory of Lee Kyung Hae Americas Program Analysts americasirc-online.org http://www.foodfirst.org/printformat.php?id=321

NFFC: National Family Farm Coalition

George Naylor said, "NFFC is in Cancun to urge a reversal of US government corporate welfare for agribusiness cartel (Monsanto, Archer Daniel Midland, Cargill, etc.) to be replaced by the introduction of fair pricing structures and rational food supply management ."

Hiroshi Kanno, retired US government employee and Central Wisconsin resident said, "The plight of [world farmers] is caused by global trade rules that prioritize profit over public welfare." "One more time we flatly and emphatically demand that the WTO take the Agricultural Agreement (AoA) out of the agenda."

{14} Ambrose, S., (12 Sept. 2003) Korean farmer's suicide rattles Cancun activists assess meaning of dramatic death of farm leader Molly Spence, National Family Farm Coalition nffc@nffc.net  http://nffc.net

ACGA: American Corn Growers Association

Alan Guebert of the ACGA

"Developing Nations with tens of millions of poor, undernourished people saw the US-EU agreement as a thin gauze to veil their unwillingness to make necessary cuts in farm subsidies."

"Four African nations [Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali] demanded America reduce its ample domestic subsidies on cotton because ... US subsidies denied their countries' farmers a fair return." ... "Zoellick and Veneman lectured the Africans and angered them instead of having previously spoken to them."

"The U.S. wants a NAFTA like deal-- [with] few controls on corporations; the EU is willing to permit more government sovereignty [to remain]. ...

{4} Guebert, A. (19 Sept. 2003) Mexican stand-off: what happened in Cancun what it means, Final Word-American Corn Growers Association: Issue 66 finalword@agnet.net

NFU: National Farmers Union

Robert Carlson, president North Dakota Farmers Union and head of National Farmers Union legislative trade committee said:

"Food is different ... [s]upply does not respond enough to low prices and neither does demand. Therefore, all we're doing by lower prices is lowering our farm income."

{15} Carlson, R. (2003 Oct.) NFU: Farmers' interests left out of trade talks at WTO meetings National Farmers Union News, 50, Number 8, p.4

John Hansen Nebraska Farmers Union President & NFU National Secretary said:

"Our trade policy continues to be dominated and directed by U.S. based international agribusiness processors and exporters who want to buy more ag products for less money." "Unfortunately the USTR [Zoellick] seems to put private processor company interests ahead of ag producers and our overall [U.S.] country interest. As the U.S. based international grain and meat cartel continue to beat down domestic ag commodity prices, world commodity prices collapse in a chain reaction, downward."

{16) Hansen, J. (18 Sept. 2003) "Nebraska farmers union president Hansen characterizes public debate over AG subsidies as 'Dysfunctional and non-productive'" Albert Krebs: The Agribusiness Examiner #287  avkrebs@earthlink.net].

APAC: Agricultural Policy Analysis Center-University of Tennessee

Dr. Daryll E. Ray, Agricultural Economist, said "[S]ince 1996, when the Freedom To Farm Act legislation was passed ... America's four chief exports (corn, wheat, soybeans, and cotton) have plunged more than 40%. [Other countries] have harvested poorer incomes, hunger, desperation and migration."

"Summation: This cheap-grain policy has benefited multinational agribusiness firms, large livestock operations, and importers-not crop farmers, who now sell grain below their cost of production ... This ... damages the agricultural economies of developing countries."

{6} Ray, D. E., De La Torre Ugarte D. G., & Tiller, K.J. (Summer 2003) Rethinking US agricultural policy: changing course to secure farmer livelihoods worldwide, executive summary Agricultural Policy Analysis Center, The University of Tennessee dray@utk.edu  http://.agpolicy.org/blueprint.html

Professor Daniel De La Torre, APAC, University of Tennessee, originally from Peru, said, " There is no question that the U.S. is exporting poverty."

{17} De La Torre Ugarte D.G. (19 Sept. 2003) Food is matter of national security for all APAC Weekly Articles, The University of Tennessee http://www.ag.policy.org.org/ dray@utk.edu

GM-WATCH: Claire Robinson, an anti-GM[O] genetically modified organism spokesperson, says:

"The U.S. is working to force open markets for genetically engineered crops whether via WTO, regional trade pacts or bilateral agreements."

"Australia's Prime Minister [John Howard] offered unfettered investment access for U.S. multinationals and "relaxed labelling for genetically modified food" in exchange for a bilateral "free trade agreement."

{18} Robinson, C. (20 Sept. 2003) Latest news in brief on the GM issue Weekly Watch Number 40  ngin@gmwatch.org weekly@gmwatch.org

The Cancun Failure by the New York Times:

"[T]he American farm lobby is split between those who want to profit from greater access to foreign markets and less efficient sectors that demand continued coddling from Washington.

{8}  Becker, E., (16 Sept. 2003) Coming U.S. vote figures in walkout at trade talks, Cancun, Mexico The New York Times nytimes.com

Health Coverage for Farmers:

Larry Mitchell said, "Farm families work off the farm to make ends meet and/or secure health coverage."

{19} Mitchell, L. (18 Sept. 2003) "American Corn Growers Association charges latest USDA ERS income projections 'maliciously misleading'" Albert Krebs: The Agribusiness Examiner #287 avkrebs@earthlink.net

Paschal Lamy of EU Trade Commission said, " EU wanted to discuss: [2 of the Singapore Issues]

(1) Trade facilitation;

(2) Government Procurement;"

(3) [But] Korea Objected wanted all four [Singapore] issues discussed simultaneously as did Brussels.

(5) ... The "EU [w]ant[s] to protect $48 billion subsidies."

(6) "The aim of the WTO is not to eliminate all supports for agriculture... but to reduce trade distorting support ... ."

{4}  Guebert, A. (19 Sept. 2003) Mexican Stand-off: what happened in Cancun what it means  Final Word-American Corn Growers Association: Issue 66 finalword@agnet.net

FABIANISTS: Michael Jacobs Fabian Society of international socialist democrats.

"[P]rogressive globalism demands a more democratic form of global governance. International institutions such as the UN Security Council, the International Monetary Fund [IMF] and the World Bank [WB] are ruled by the rich countries of the developed world. They need to be democratized and their activities made much more accountable to national parliaments and people, if they are to have proper legitimacy. ... [P]rogressive globalism ... seeks a new coalition for change, uniting progressive governments, NGOs, trade unions and even enlightened businesses. After Cancun, the need could not be more urgent."

{20} Jacobs, M. (19 Sept. 2003) Beyond Cancun, globalism can be a force for social justice, but only if capitalism is managed with that aim The Guardian Unlimited

Small Third World Farmers From Central America [Lesser Developed].

A NYT article says, "Due to inflation of oil ... [prices] developing countries urgently need money."   "Countries are forced to downsize government, cut wages, privatize services, impose fees, cut public pensions, devalue currency, outlaw protectionism.  Fertile fields lie fallow.... Local investment is de-emphasized due to stress for foreign investment.  Hanes, Disney, Nike, Adidas, J.C. Penny, Sears, WAL-MART, seek out countries with high unemployment. [There is a D]e- emphasis of social welfare."    (use indirect quote?)

{21} Guatemalan farmer: Maldonado, A. (2003 Sept. 28) From the highlands to your grocer The New York Times nytimes.com

Chemical Industry

" The chemical industry hopes for a timetable on the elimination of global tariffs were thwarted with the collapse of trade talks at the WTO... meeting in Cancun...

{22} Mullin, R., (2003 Sept. 22). No can do in Cancun Chemical & Engineering News 22, p.8.

OCM: Organization for Competitive Markets

Mike Callicrate, (Organization for Competitive Markets leader, cattle feedlot owner and beef processor)

"The failure of the WTO talks at Cancun is significant and very encouraging. The folly of corporate controlled globalization has finally been exposed for what it is- human exploitation and enslavement on an unprecedented global scale. Perhaps we will now be successful in uprooting the U.S. sponsored WTO, World Bank and International Monetary Fund seeds of hate, discontent and terrorism before they further undermine and destroy access to even more essential human resources and people's God-given rights."

{23} Callicrate, M. (6 Oct. 2003) Personal Communication Mike@nobull.net

Mexico Solidarity Network Analysis:

"In the final analysis, there were almost no areas of agreement between Northern and Southern nations.  Southern Nations objected to massive agricultural subsidies by the US and EU that result in dumping of basic grains at prices below cost of production, threatening the existence of millions of Southern producers.

"Although they had dismantled the triple layer ten foot high steel fence: On Saturday at a ceremony, the Korean delegation and large group of women ended with "hundreds of demonstrators presenting white carnations to police."

{2.} WTO meeting collapses amid North-South divide (8-14 Sept. 2003) Mexico Solidarity Network Weekly News and Analysis

CANCUN ARTICLE: 2  (10/29/03)

THE WORLD BATTLE:

We have a worldwide battle for control of agriculture by various forces:

                  1. Greedy multinational corporations and cartels;

                  2. Narrow minded world socialistic politicians-more powerful than many governments;

                  3. Pantheist environmentalists bent on worshipping and serving Mother Earth;

                  4. A narrow-minded Church backing the wealthy, choosing the reinstitution of serfdom for world peasant farmers by default; most clergy sympathetic to the poor were laicized, made ineffectual, or thrown out with the bath water of liberation theology.

                  5. Large corporate farmers, factory farms, and cartel-controlled agribusiness receive commodities from farmers and ranchers without fair economic contracts and rules;

                  6. A media misrepresenting and editing the supposed reality reported as news according to their owner's philosophy;

                  7. Western Countries controlling the World Trade Organization [WTO] undeveloped countries with tariffs, subsidies, the International Monetary Fund [IMF] and the World Bank [WB];

All the above, seek to influence an assembly-line dull-eyed consumer bent on thinking and acting as they are told while third world peasants are destined to produce flowers and small crops not easily harvested by machines with multinational corporations controlling world government and the major commodities.

The above are misguided by extremes of philosophies supposedly promulgated by:

                  1. Adam Smith credited with capitalism; he did not believe in predatory capitalism but believed in charitable donations and fairness to the poor;

                  2. Rachel Carson; she was not for the present extremist environmentalism; today many environmentalists are afraid that if the truth about environmental improvement in the last 30 years is publicized that "people will get complacent on us."  Some use environmental issues to stop hated capitalism.

3. Pope John XXIII was for the poor; Pope John Paul II, as much as I love him, seems to be overly influenced from being under tyrannical Communism and being in a Church presently patterned after the Roman Emperors instead of the initial democracy present in the Church until the late 4th Century A.D.  Semi-democratic "collegiality" was stressed by Vatican II; it is out of vogue under Pope John Paul II.

                  4. The establishment of commodity contracts was meant to be a device so that the producer-merchant-consumer all got profit or the ability to purchase food at a fair level. Now at places like the Chicago Board of Trade [CBOT] and Chicago Mercantile Exchange [CME], gambling and cheating are the modes of action.

                  5. Parity was established in the 1910s as a mode of judging the fairness of commodity prices for producers.  Parity established the average prices of commodities from 1910-1914 when all U.S. economic sectors were balanced. When projections of commodity prices adjusted for inflation are calculated, the present commodities sell for an average of about 35% ofParity. When most technological advances were made in farming and ranching, there was an overcorrection so that small and medium family farmers and ranchers came away with proportionately lesser profit and overall income.

The forecast is that farm households in 2003 will average $3,968 from farming; 93.8% of farm income is made off the farm to put food on the table and secure health coverage. Smaller farmers and ranchers have been squeezed so that of the 1.9 million farmers only 150,000 large farmers produce the majority of produce [72%]. Large farms receive most of U.S. subsidies. USDA works for big agribusiness and against most farmers.

                  6. Government has been twisted so that the influence of multinational corporations has been totally self-serving. Congress has been bought by corporate donations and the "revolving door" has placed a select few in positions able to control the U.S. State Department, Defense Department, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the U.S. Department of Justice in critical positions to do the will of the elite and not the family farmer or rancher. Enforcement of rules has been given to effete or corrupt officials.

                  A philosophy and economy must be tempered with paradigm including love, justice, and reality. Moral relations remain a dangerous pit open to swallow the careless wanderer through life. The desires and interests of the majority of the producers are rejected due to the over influence of a minority seeking profit at any cost to the producer.

The world's poor farmers have been abandoned by uncaring big governments, multinational corporations, extremist environmentalists, the World Bank, anarchists, those with a global socialist philosophy, an ultra-liberal media out of control, greedy contract traders gambling with the futures of family producers, the International Monetary Fund forcing privatization of local natural resources, and the policies of a regal Church saddling-up to the wealthy.


OTHER INTERESTING REFERENCES

27. Participation Data: http://www.wto.org

28. Cambridge U. Press Items to buy: http://www.wto.org/english/res_e/booksp_e/cup_e.htm

29. Day 1: Conference Kicks Off: http://www.org/english/thewto_e/min03_e/min03_10sept_e.htm

30. Day 2: Cambodia and Nepal membership Sealed,Singapore Issues: http://wto.org/english/thewto_e/minist_e/min03-e/min03_11sept_e. htm

31. Day 3: "Facilatory" Start of Work: http://wto.org/english/thewto_e/minist_e/min03_e/ min03_12sept_htm

32. Day 4: As Ministers Commit on New Draft, Chairperson Warns of Dangers of Failure: http://.wto.org/english/thewto_e/minist_e/min03-e/min03_13sept_e .htm

33. Day 5: Conference Ends Without Consensus; [Singapore Issues]: http://.wto.org/english/thewto_e/minist_e/min03-e/min03_14sept_e .htm

34. NGO Participation in Ministerial Conference: http://www.wto.org/english/news_e/news_e.htm

35. Dispute Settlement Body (2 Oct. 2003): http://www.wto.org/english/news_e_news03_e/dsb_2oct03_e.htm< /p>

36. The Doha Declaration Explained (Timetable for Resolution for Most is Jan. 2005: http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/dda_e/dohaexplained_e.htm

37. New WTO


Edward M. Fashing
emfashing@socket.net
573-687-3244
2898 Audrain Road 114
Sturgeon, Missouri 65284